writing workshops

The Writer’s Craft part II

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In addition to the Objects class I will be teaching at Edmond’s Community College this fall I will also facilitate the eight week course, Writer’s Craft Part II this year from September 21st through November 9th. I’m excited to teach this class as it encompasses everything from the Hero’s Journey to crafting that perfect first sentence. This eight week class is for all skill levels and all storytelling genres; memoir, fiction, non-fiction, short story, and screenplay. Bring your WIP (work in progress) or get inspired in class to start a new writing project. Lots of writing time, lots of critiquing, lots of creativity.

Class time structure (each week); Q & A and writing time based on individual student’s projects as seen through the lens of class material. For example, applying the Hero’s Journey or unique plot devices, developing voice, etc., to their story in progress, or the beginning of one, regardless of genre or skill level. If students want critique, there will be a workshopping schedule set for maximum 10 pages each. Weekly recommended resources and handouts.

Brief sample of class schedule:

9/21 Week One – Every Story Begins With a Journey

Identifying and finding your HERO’S JOURNEY

9/ 28 Week Two – Page One

FIRST LINES  First sentences, of course, have different functions—to amuse, to frighten, to mystify—and the mechanics a writer uses to achieve this connection vary from genre to genre. We’ll do an exploration of great first lines and how knowing the hero’s journey empowers a writer to pen that first line of the journey to follow.

10/ 5 Week Three – Plot Devices  (see previous post)

HOW OBJECTS HELP TELL A STORY  

10/12 Week Four — Individual Writing & Open Mic Night

Focus on Student Writing – critiquing/workshopping exchange, and open mic night.

10/19 Week Five – The most dreaded word in writing, EDITING

10/26 Week Six – WHY OUTLINING MATTERS (regardless of genre)

The basics of genre; memoir, romance, mystery, thriller, horror, etc.. Also, short story, flash fiction, screenwriting…outlining matters. Outlining your novel (short story or memoir) or flying by the seat of your pants (called pantsers), and why it matters. 10 steps to follow in outlining.

11/2 Week Seven – Critique Night

11/9 Week Eight – WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED 

Sign up HERE

NEW!  The Writer’s Craft Part II  
Item: C522 Mindy Halleck
6:30 PM – 8:30 PM Location: Snoqualmie Hall   205
Sessions: 8 Th 20000 68th Ave W Lynnwood, WA 98036
9/21/2017 – 11/9/2017 Fee: $175.00

 

New Class; How Objects Help Tell a Story

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It’s writing conference season and this year I miss not being at one. I love the classes and the social get-togethers with my tribe of like-minded scribes.  I’m getting tweets and other social media pings from my friends at Willamette Writers conference (wish I was there) as I did from the PNWA conference last week. Though, full disclaimer, I did go to the one day Christopher Vogler (www.thewritersjourney.com)  workshop last week in Seattle which of course was great. Anyway, I’m not attending conferences this year because of several reasons but mainly I need to write. I have discovered that my novel will not write itself. Damn thing!

And though I am missing the conference reenergizing vibe, and I am getting some work done (a writer’s gotta write) I’m also prepping a new class. This year I will be teaching some ongoing writing courses at Edmonds Community College which I’m looking forward to. My 2nd class (already taught one last month) will start in September and is all about using plot devices in writing.

How Objects Help Tell a Story  is a 5-week course starting Sept. 20th to Oct. 18th.  

The blurb: What’s Lord of the Rings without the ring or Cinderella without her glass slippers? These iconic objects are shorthand for legendary stories that couldn’t be told without them. Well-crafted objects (plot devices) in fiction or non-fiction writing can establish a character’s values, inform their choices and actions and thus the story. Learn to create a narrative for an object in a character’s life, how that object can be backstory shorthand, enhance storytelling, help eliminate pages of narration, and tell a more layered story….

Please join me each week at Edmonds CC …to sign up please click here.

And if you’re at a writers conference this week, go ahead and tweet me, though I’m already jealous, I’m happy to live vicariously. So have fun, make great contacts and pitch your work to everyone you can. Good luck. Cheers, Mindy

Please share, tweet it out, find me at @MindyHalleck

What is an author platform and where do you get one?

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Author platform can be challenging to explain, partly because definitions can vary. But by far the simplest description is: your capacity to sell books because of who you are or who you can reach.

What activities build author platform?

Platform building requires consistent, continuing effort over the course of a writer’s career. It also means making enhancements in extending your network, on-line and in person. It’s about making waves that entice other people to you—not about pleading with others to pay attention.

The following list is not extensive, but helps give you an idea of how to cultivate a platform.

Publish or distribute quality work in outlets you want to be associated with and that your target audience reads.

Create a portfolio of work on your own platform—e.g., blog, e-mail newsletter, social network, podcast, video, digital downloads, etc—that gathers quality followers or a community of people who are interested in what you have to say. Have patience because this takes time.

Decide which Social Media Platform is best for you, use it and be consistent, relevant and entertaining. And remember, social media alone does NOT create platform unless you’re a Kardashian, and even they get out and do public appearances.

Speak at and or attend events where you meet new people and extend your network of like-minded peers and audience members.

Connect with influencers* and or peers on a new project and or discover creative ways to extend your visibility. *An influencers is a person or group possessing the ability to influence the behavior or opinions of others, via large SM following, podcast audience, etc.

Discover personalized ways to engage with and develop your target audience, whether through content, events, online marketing/promotion, etc.

Platform building is unique to each author

Platform building is a gradual process that must be organic and will be different for every author. There is no checklist you can use to develop a platform, because it will always be governed by:

Your distinct story and or message – Your unique strengths and abilities – Your target readership

I will be teaching a workshop July 15th at Edmonds Community College wherein part of the day will be spent on social media. If you’re local, join us here

If you liked this, please TWEET it out for heaven’s sake!