Why We Write the Stories We Write

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It’s commonly accepted that Nazi Germany’s concentration camps were/are the epicenter of human sorrow and suffering as a result of human against human brutality. These places stand as tributes to the human race’s capability when fear leads to either blind faith in religion or government, or when vile rhetoric becomes our prime cheerleader. They are living tombstones honoring, not just the victims, but also the sins of those who shot innocent people with wild glee, locked gas chamber doors against the screams of their victims, or, perhaps more inexcusably, closed their eyes to grievous inhumanity. Or worse yet, today in 2017, those who deny the holocaust ever happened. The politics of today have everything to do with why I’m writing my next novel, Garden of Lies, not that it’s about politics specifically, but because it puts a face on a victim of the last time people endorsed fear and anger as their guide and allowed them to justify releasing the largest gathering of sociopaths ever – in Nazi uniforms – on an entire population.                                       That’s my two-bits, now back to storytelling…
Using imagery in storytelling means constantly looking for images, old photos that will help me make the world I am creating (WWII concentration camps, 1960 Portland Oregon, and 1930’s Egypt) come to life in my head and ultimately in a reader’s mind. I collect images and information for my research and save it on my Pinterest board. For example, this image helps me envision what my main protagonist, Esmée sees in her dreams – memories of Auschwitz – and the ghosts who haunt her. Visit my Pinterest board to see the world I’m creating. Please follow my board if interested.                                                         Though I could not find (via Google image search) the source of this photo, I have linked it to the info I did find. http://www.mindyhalleck.com

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4 thoughts on “Why We Write the Stories We Write

    TanyaG said:
    March 14, 2017 at 9:02 pm

    Thank you for sharing. This image says so much. And your words I feel. Look forward to reading more.

    Like

      Mindy responded:
      March 15, 2017 at 4:00 pm

      Tanya, Thank you for reading and taking time to comment. Be well, Mindy

      Like

    larryzb said:
    March 15, 2017 at 5:59 pm

    But, what if we have been told is distorted, exaggerated, and not completely true?

    Like

      Mindy responded:
      March 15, 2017 at 6:53 pm

      That’s why researching, investigating, reviewing facts and questioning the status-quo is critical.

      Like

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