morning pages

The Seven Dwarves of Writing – Silencing The Shadow-Self

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Julia Cameron, author of The Artist’s Way, suggests that when we write our morning (or mourning) pages we should think of it as taking our shadow-self out for coffee. I love that!

 

We must get all the cantankerous, crabby, complaining stuff out in order to clear the path for what’s to come.

As a fiction writer, I find this to be an invaluable tool. Often it’s tough to get my brain to stop obsessing about the day; my grocery list, meetings, phone calls, arguments, what time does my husband get home, and for goodness sakes I need to call my mom, and etc.…the day at hand. I need to get through those twenty-foot reeds to get to the creative side of my brain, and sometimes I just can’t get through them on my own.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                That’s where the morning pages come in. Writing LONGHAND, which means no typing, gives you access to your subconscious mind in a way that does not happen when using a computer. In addition, it’s good for your brain, science says so. Don’t believe me, read this Forbes article.

I like to think of my shadow self as the seven dwarfs; Grumpy, Dopey, Doc, Happy, Bashful, Sneezy and Sleepy.

The seven dwarfs symbolize different aspects of our self (dark and light sides).

Happy embraces the universe from a delighted state of mind and emotions.

Sneezy repels or banishes anything unwholesome that comes from the world.

Bashful helps us return to our secluded cosmos, giving us respite from the world.

Grumpy is the part of us that struggles against light.

Doc leads the parade in whining and complaining. Doc is the intellectual side that keeps us in touch with spiteful reality.

Sleepy is the turn-the-power-off apparatus within us, enabling us to take a break from chaos, to shut down when we need time alone.

Then there’s Dopey who embodies our naïve, innocent nature wonderfully unaware of the perils whirling around us.

Once I’ve written my way through those disruptive dwarfs, and they are all down for their nap, I start my writing journey and when I’m lucky I often arrive on Snow White’s doorstep—my inner writer.

Snow White symbolizes the purity and innocence that exists within us all. She beautifies the scenery of our mind, our thoughts, and feelings. She echoes our innermost radiance and reveals our most imaginative intelligence.

From this safe creative space—dwarves hushed—I can create.

And once I’ve started creating, I delve deeper into the stories I’m trying to tell. It’s only then, when the dwarfs are quiet, and Snow White is safe, that I can access my even darker self and craft an antagonist, aspiring to one like Snow White’s Queen.

The Queen—Snow White’s antagonist—represents our inner demons, the untamed ego, greed and the desire of self-gratifying pursuits. The Queen is the false (image) of self—the truest representation of a shadow-self.

Anyway, for me to arrive at a place where I can write a protagonist and an antagonist worth exploring, I need to silence the voices inside my head—That’s tongue-in-cheek, people. I do not really hear voices in my head. Just workin’ an analogy here—That means those annoying dwarves must take a nap. They have to behave, be quiet, and let me write.

 

Therefore, I allow them to have their say first, like toddlers; once I’ve listened to their wants, needs and complaints, they can go down for nap. QUIET TIME!

 

Moreover, for me, one way to achieve that goal is through morning pages, afternoon pages, writing in my car, or maybe sitting in a cafe in Florence writing my morning pages while my husband climbs the Duomo.

Keep writing everyone. Silence those dwarves, but let them play on occasion.